Press "Enter" to skip to content

When Is Your Brain Ready for Social Media

When Is Your Brain Ready for Social Media? soft music – So back in the day, way, way back in 2006 when I was 12 years old, the principal came to the classroom to warn us about the dangers of Myspace. Cyberbullying, inappropriate content, stranger danger! Now if you dont know what Myspace is, its basically like Facebook with music kinda. But anyway, the principle tries to scare us, and that just made me want a Myspace even more. So I go home, ask my mom, Can I have a Myspace?

Shes like, Sure, I dont care. So I go and make one, but you have to be 13. So what do I do?

I just lie, and click that I was 13, and there you go. Thats the start of my social media career. So thats my story. But now it seems like theres tons of kids on social media, and when I say kids, I mean like little kids.

Eight and under. Maybe their parents started an account for them when they were babies and now they wanna take control of their own brand. Or they were like me and just lied and clicked Yes, Im 13. But just because it was easy for me to get on social media, should I have been? I mean, I turned okay, I mean, more or less, but looking back, I wonder is there any downside to starting social media so young.

So whats the right age to start using social media? Okay, first we know theres lots of kids on social media. According to a 2015 Common Sense Media study, an estimated 20 of kids between eight and 12 years old are using social media with or without their parents okay.

That same study found that those kids are spending an average of six hours a day on media like TV, article games, and social media. And keep in mind that this was from 2015, and Im guessin theres even more kids on social media now. And it makes sense. Half the kids I know want their own YouTube channel. You could be just like me!

But when you sign up for social media, you gotta put an age in and in most cases, you have to be 13. So why is that, anyway? Its from an actual law called the Childrens Online Privacy and Protection Act or COPPA. Congress passed the law back in 1998 when Mark Zuckerberg was barely old enough to have his own social media account.

Wait, was social media even a thing back then? No, it wasnt. But law makers are worried about companies or other random people online collecting information from kids like their name, phone number, and later photos and location without their parents knowledge.

All stuff that applies today with social media. So what makes 13 so special anyway? Well, its not really clear.

But what is clear is that its a really easy rule to get around. But just because you can, does that mean that you should? All right, lets start with potential risks.

First theres privacy issues. Companies collect and share all kinds of data from users from where you live, to the last thing that you bought online. They may even broadcast your current location. And thats something that your little brother may not be thinking about when he posts that random article on TikTok. The whole thinking around COPPA is that children are considered a vulnerable group, and that they should be protected from this stuff.

Unless their parents are okay with it. The idea is that when youre older, youve got more life experience, and you can make better decisions about what to share. We know that kids start experimenting with sharing their own data online when theyre 11-13, but they dont really start to understand the risks and the consequences of what they do online until theyre 14-16 years old.

Then theres safety. Plain and simple. Even if you put aside all the concerns about data privacy, theres still the issue of visibility.

Kids can interact with strangers on social media. Kinda like all the stuff my principal was talking about when she was warning us about Myspace. Online predators, identity theft, cyberbullying, people accessing your personal information are all risks we take whenever we use social media. And then theres mental health issues to think about. After all, childrens brains are still developing.

A scientific study found that kids brains are highly sensitive to acceptance and rejection. Spending all of this time in online communities may have the power to change how a kid feels about themselves. I mean, who doesnt love getting love online.

But what about kids who feel rejected or depressed when they dont get enough? Do we really want their self-esteem to be connected to a virtual heart or thumbs up? And dont get me started on trolls. Personally, Im like, you know, haters are gonna hate, and Im not trying to sound cool or anything, but I guarantee a troll wouldnt say any of it to my face. Thats why I hate the idea of kids taking these random internet trolls seriously.

Is there gonna be cost to kids who grow up needing online approval? So all that sounds pretty bad for kids, right? But Im talking to you right now on a social media platform. And clearly, Im having a positive impact on young minds.

Now some research shows that social media can be a good things for teens. For example, in this study, teens reported that social media makes them feel better about themselves. They also report it makes them feel more conifident and less lonely and depressed.

Then theres the argument that younger teens often need social media to find support and community that they have a hard time finding face to face. One of the first examples of this is the It Gets Better movement that reached out to young queer kids. Kids have also used social media to get support for everything from organizing around a cause or dealing with mental illness.

One young man reached out on Minecraft and was met with overwhelming support when he admitted to considering suicide. And social media can lead to more than just online friendships or support forums. It can also help teens mobilize around causes that theyre passionate about. Research shows that active youth engagement in politics and civic issues are linked to more active engagement as adults. It helps build identity, purpose, and even health and academic pursuits.

So lets use some of our data plans for building those intellectual and activist muscles, people! Cmon! Lets get to it!

The Parkland teens used twitter to build a global movement for safer gun laws. And its not just high school students making a big impact. At just 13, Alexandria Villaseñor used social media to gain support for her climate protest at the UN.

So looking back now, if I could give advice to 12 year old Miles, it would be forget Myspace, buy stock in Facebook. Early. But wait, this isnt about me. Its about you. So what do you think?

When do you think you became mature enough to handle all the pros and cons of social media? Let us know what you think in the comments below. Now if this article has you rethinking how you use social media, check out our other article all about the pros and cons of all that time you spend using screens. And a big shout out to our partners at Common Sense Education.

They helped us make this article. If youre a teacher, check out their digital citizenship curriculum in the description below. So as always, support us with a like and a subscribe. Until next time, guys. Peace out!

When Is Your Brain Ready for Social Media? soft music – So back in the day, way, way back in 2006 when I was 12 years old, the principal came to the classroom to warn us about the dangers of Myspace. Cyberbullying, inappropriate content, stranger danger! Now if you dont know what Myspace is, its basically like Facebook with music kinda. But anyway, the principle tries to scare us, and that just made me want a Myspace even more. So I go home, ask my mom, Can I have a Myspace?

Shes like, Sure, I dont care. So I go and make one, but you have to be 13. So what do I do? I just lie, and click that I was 13, and there you go. Thats the start of my social media career.

So thats my story. But now it seems like theres tons of kids on social media, and when I say kids, I mean like little kids. Eight and under. Maybe their parents started an account for them when they were babies and now they wanna take control of their own brand.

Or they were like me and just lied and clicked Yes, Im 13. But just because it was easy for me to get on social media, should I have been? I mean, I turned okay, I mean, more or less, but looking back, I wonder is there any downside to starting social media so young. So whats the right age to start using social media?

Okay, first we know theres lots of kids on social media. According to a 2015 Common Sense Media study, an estimated 20 of kids between eight and 12 years old are using social media with or without their parents okay. That same study found that those kids are spending an average of six hours a day on media like TV, article games, and social media.

And keep in mind that this was from 2015, and Im guessin theres even more kids on social media now. And it makes sense. Half the kids I know want their own YouTube channel. You could be just like me! But when you sign up for social media, you gotta put an age in and in most cases, you have to be 13.

So why is that, anyway? Its from an actual law called the Childrens Online Privacy and Protection Act or COPPA. Congress passed the law back in 1998 when Mark Zuckerberg was barely old enough to have his own social media account. Wait, was social media even a thing back then?

No, it wasnt. But law makers are worried about companies or other random people online collecting information from kids like their name, phone number, and later photos and location without their parents knowledge. All stuff that applies today with social media.

So what makes 13 so special anyway? Well, its not really clear. But what is clear is that its a really easy rule to get around. But just because you can, does that mean that you should? All right, lets start with potential risks.

First theres privacy issues. Companies collect and share all kinds of data from users from where you live, to the last thing that you bought online. They may even broadcast your current location.

And thats something that your little brother may not be thinking about when he posts that random article on TikTok. The whole thinking around COPPA is that children are considered a vulnerable group, and that they should be protected from this stuff. Unless their parents are okay with it. The idea is that when youre older, youve got more life experience, and you can make better decisions about what to share.

We know that kids start experimenting with sharing their own data online when theyre 11-13, but they dont really start to understand the risks and the consequences of what they do online until theyre 14-16 years old. Then theres safety. Plain and simple.

Even if you put aside all the concerns about data privacy, theres still the issue of visibility. Kids can interact with strangers on social media. Kinda like all the stuff my principal was talking about when she was warning us about Myspace. Online predators, identity theft, cyberbullying, people accessing your personal information are all risks we take whenever we use social media. And then theres mental health issues to think about.

After all, childrens brains are still developing. A scientific study found that kids brains are highly sensitive to acceptance and rejection. Spending all of this time in online communities may have the power to change how a kid feels about themselves. I mean, who doesnt love getting love online.

But what about kids who feel rejected or depressed when they dont get enough? Do we really want their self-esteem to be connected to a virtual heart or thumbs up? And dont get me started on trolls.

Personally, Im like, you know, haters are gonna hate, and Im not trying to sound cool or anything, but I guarantee a troll wouldnt say any of it to my face. Thats why I hate the idea of kids taking these random internet trolls seriously. Is there gonna be cost to kids who grow up needing online approval? So all that sounds pretty bad for kids, right? But Im talking to you right now on a social media platform.

And clearly, Im having a positive impact on young minds. Now some research shows that social media can be a good things for teens. For example, in this study, teens reported that social media makes them feel better about themselves.

They also report it makes them feel more conifident and less lonely and depressed. Then theres the argument that younger teens often need social media to find support and community that they have a hard time finding face to face. One of the first examples of this is the It Gets Better movement that reached out to young queer kids. Kids have also used social media to get support for everything from organizing around a cause or dealing with mental illness. One young man reached out on Minecraft and was met with overwhelming support when he admitted to considering suicide.

And social media can lead to more than just online friendships or support forums. It can also help teens mobilize around causes that theyre passionate about. Research shows that active youth engagement in politics and civic issues are linked to more active engagement as adults. It helps build identity, purpose, and even health and academic pursuits. So lets use some of our data plans for building those intellectual and activist muscles, people!

Cmon! Lets get to it! The Parkland teens used twitter to build a global movement for safer gun laws.

And its not just high school students making a big impact. At just 13, Alexandria Villaseñor used social media to gain support for her climate protest at the UN. So looking back now, if I could give advice to 12 year old Miles, it would be forget Myspace, buy stock in Facebook.

Early. But wait, this isnt about me. Its about you. So what do you think? When do you think you became mature enough to handle all the pros and cons of social media?

Let us know what you think in the comments below. Now if this article has you rethinking how you use social media, check out our other article all about the pros and cons of all that time you spend using screens. And a big shout out to our partners at Common Sense Education. They helped us make this article. If youre a teacher, check out their digital citizenship curriculum in the description below.

So as always, support us with a like and a subscribe. Until next time, guys. Peace out!

Be First to Comment

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *