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QA Simulator Chemistry made easy – Congressional App Challenge 2020 Winner

QA Simulator: Chemistry made easy – Congressional App Challenge 2017 Winner Hi. Im Pranav Vaid, and this is the Qualitative Analysis App. First, lets discuss what qualitative analysis is. Qualitative Analysis is a very important process in chemistry used by high school students and college professors alike to identify an unknown compound in 2 major steps. The first step is to burn the compound and observe the color of the flame, as each cation gives off a unique color.

The second step is to observe trends in how the compound precipitates from a solution, as each compound has a unique pattern in how it precipitates. However, this process is very tedious and lengthy, because identifying the compound requires comparing the observed data with trends of hundreds of different compounds. This process is made even more difficult by the fact that there is no easily accessible resource to look up these trends, so doing qualitative analysis requires chemists to purchase expensive books or fragment the trends together from many different websites. This app not only makes this comparison easy, but also uses computer algorithms to optimize how qualitative analysis is conducted making it a novel and accessible application in chemistry that can benefit any chemist or student. The app runs on a computer algorithm I designed, which compares user inputted data with the trends of over 650 compounds and determines all possible compounds that the user may have, allowing users to more quickly and accurately identify an unknown compound compared to conventional methods.

Another computer algorithm I designed also determines the most optimal way for a user to identify their compound, and provides live suggestions to the user, a novel idea that speeds up qualitative analysis significantly. I also designed a game in this app, which allows schools who do not have funds to purchase the expensive equipment or compounds required for qualitative analysis to still teach students how the process works in a fun and interactive way. This is important, because qualitative analysis is a key part of chemistry, and not knowing how the procedure works puts aspiring chemists at a disadvantage compared to their peers. I have tested this app within chemistry classes in my school, and it has proven to be almost 100 accurate in identifying unknown compounds while speeding up the process significantly.

Additionally, the game portion of my app was a success in making people familiar with qualitative analysis, and the highscore system it contains motivated students to make themselves better at qualitative analysis. Talking with the teachers at my school, they are excited to use this app as part of the curriculum in their classes, and have indicated that they would love for the app to include games for other key procedures in chemistry, such as balancing equations, gravimetric analysis, and chemical nomenclature. Additionally, future versions of this app can find more uses in universities and classrooms if it is expanded to include computer algorithms that can predict the results of complex chemical reactions, assist in gravimetric analysis, or predict solubility of compounds under various conditions. With all the potential this app has, I am excited to explore and implement it further in the near future. QA Simulator: Chemistry made easy – Congressional App Challenge 2017 Winner Hi.

Im Pranav Vaid, and this is the Qualitative Analysis App. First, lets discuss what qualitative analysis is. Qualitative Analysis is a very important process in chemistry used by high school students and college professors alike to identify an unknown compound in 2 major steps. The first step is to burn the compound and observe the color of the flame, as each cation gives off a unique color. The second step is to observe trends in how the compound precipitates from a solution, as each compound has a unique pattern in how it precipitates.

However, this process is very tedious and lengthy, because identifying the compound requires comparing the observed data with trends of hundreds of different compounds. This process is made even more difficult by the fact that there is no easily accessible resource to look up these trends, so doing qualitative analysis requires chemists to purchase expensive books or fragment the trends together from many different websites. This app not only makes this comparison easy, but also uses computer algorithms to optimize how qualitative analysis is conducted making it a novel and accessible application in chemistry that can benefit any chemist or student.

The app runs on a computer algorithm I designed, which compares user inputted data with the trends of over 650 compounds and determines all possible compounds that the user may have, allowing users to more quickly and accurately identify an unknown compound compared to conventional methods. Another computer algorithm I designed also determines the most optimal way for a user to identify their compound, and provides live suggestions to the user, a novel idea that speeds up qualitative analysis significantly. I also designed a game in this app, which allows schools who do not have funds to purchase the expensive equipment or compounds required for qualitative analysis to still teach students how the process works in a fun and interactive way.

This is important, because qualitative analysis is a key part of chemistry, and not knowing how the procedure works puts aspiring chemists at a disadvantage compared to their peers. I have tested this app within chemistry classes in my school, and it has proven to be almost 100 accurate in identifying unknown compounds while speeding up the process significantly. Additionally, the game portion of my app was a success in making people familiar with qualitative analysis, and the highscore system it contains motivated students to make themselves better at qualitative analysis. Talking with the teachers at my school, they are excited to use this app as part of the curriculum in their classes, and have indicated that they would love for the app to include games for other key procedures in chemistry, such as balancing equations, gravimetric analysis, and chemical nomenclature. Additionally, future versions of this app can find more uses in universities and classrooms if it is expanded to include computer algorithms that can predict the results of complex chemical reactions, assist in gravimetric analysis, or predict solubility of compounds under various conditions.

With all the potential this app has, I am excited to explore and implement it further in the near future.

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