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Android Developer Story Space Ape Games – Growing in Japan

Android Developer Story: Space Ape Games – Growing in Japan SIMON HADE: When we started Space Ape, things were definitely smaller. We were only 12 people. Now, were 55. TOBY MOORE: We were new to building mobile games but had a lot of experience building games in general. We just needed to learn very quickly.

So we needed to use it as a learning platform, as well as making a article game for our users. JOE REABURN: Wed all been kicking around ideas of what would make great combat strategy game. And really, we just loved Japan. And we loved Japanese and Eastern fantasy. JOHN EARNER: Samurai Siege is about building and battling.

You build a fortress. You increase its strength. And you try and defend it against other players who are trying to steal resources from you. And you, in turn, battle them and steal their resources.

SIMON HADE: We had fairly modest ambitions for Samurai Siege when we kicked things off. We launched it initially in Australia and New Zealand. Then, we had about a six-week beta period.

JOHN EARNER: Within two weeks of putting the game live on beta, we were already making $10, 000 a day gross. And so, we went live globally. And within a month, we had about 300, 000 people daily. About a 1.5 million people playing the game monthly. And at that point, we really knew that we were onto something.

These days, we make about $55, 000 a day. It spikes on weekends. Our biggest day, we made $220, 000, which is both a small number if you compare it to some of the biggest game companies out there, but pretty cool if youre 18 or 24 months old, and youre just getting off the ground with one of your first titles. So were pretty thrilled with it. SIMON HADE: Android part of our revenue has been growing.

Its 50. A lot of the growths coming from our focus on Asia. 10 to 15 of our revenue, I think, comes from Japan alone. JOE REABURN: We always intended to take Samurai Siege to Japan. We just wanted to make sure that we got it right, because we knew we had one shot at one of the worlds largest gaming markets.

JOHN EARNER: We spent four months preparing Japan for launch. And the game had been live pretty much everywhere else. JOE REABURN: One of the reasons is, we spent a long time to localize our game and culturalize our game, just have a really high quality translation. JOHN EARNER: We learned how users see advertisements. We learned what they thought about the game.

We spent a month in beta in Japan testing it. SIMON HADE: So we had to find people who would like our game locally, who could be ambassadors for us. So then when were live, they were really the voice of our players in Japan. JOE REABURN: The alphabeta testing feature in the Google Play Development Console is a good way to go.

So you can hand-select a group of people that are associated with the Google group. And then, you can start getting feedback from users. You start seeing how your game performs in the real world.

For our marketing material on the Google Play Store, we wanted it to look like a local Japanese company had created it, which really meant more exclamation marks and cooler character drawings. We used our internal Japanese staff to tell us how to look. And we got it together.

Turns out, it looks really cool, looks really exciting. TOBY MOORE: Google Play has been a great platform to develop with. Ive really enjoyed the fast iteration speed and the way that Google think about bringing games to the Google Play Store and working with the partnership team there. JOHN EARNER: Experience has been great with Google Play.

We have found that it is about half of our audience and half of our business. Thrilling as it has been to have the success weve had to date, the thing that were really looking for, that next step, is down the road. I think thats what keeps people going in gaming is its always the thrill of working on the next game and seeing it go live.

And so, Im looking forward to the next one. Android Developer Story: Space Ape Games – Growing in Japan SIMON HADE: When we started Space Ape, things were definitely smaller. We were only 12 people. Now, were 55. TOBY MOORE: We were new to building mobile games but had a lot of experience building games in general.

We just needed to learn very quickly. So we needed to use it as a learning platform, as well as making a article game for our users. JOE REABURN: Wed all been kicking around ideas of what would make great combat strategy game. And really, we just loved Japan.

And we loved Japanese and Eastern fantasy. JOHN EARNER: Samurai Siege is about building and battling. You build a fortress. You increase its strength.

And you try and defend it against other players who are trying to steal resources from you. And you, in turn, battle them and steal their resources. SIMON HADE: We had fairly modest ambitions for Samurai Siege when we kicked things off. We launched it initially in Australia and New Zealand.

Then, we had about a six-week beta period. JOHN EARNER: Within two weeks of putting the game live on beta, we were already making $10, 000 a day gross. And so, we went live globally.

And within a month, we had about 300, 000 people daily. About a 1.5 million people playing the game monthly. And at that point, we really knew that we were onto something.

These days, we make about $55, 000 a day. It spikes on weekends. Our biggest day, we made $220, 000, which is both a small number if you compare it to some of the biggest game companies out there, but pretty cool if youre 18 or 24 months old, and youre just getting off the ground with one of your first titles.

So were pretty thrilled with it. SIMON HADE: Android part of our revenue has been growing. Its 50.

A lot of the growths coming from our focus on Asia. 10 to 15 of our revenue, I think, comes from Japan alone. JOE REABURN: We always intended to take Samurai Siege to Japan. We just wanted to make sure that we got it right, because we knew we had one shot at one of the worlds largest gaming markets.

JOHN EARNER: We spent four months preparing Japan for launch. And the game had been live pretty much everywhere else. JOE REABURN: One of the reasons is, we spent a long time to localize our game and culturalize our game, just have a really high quality translation. JOHN EARNER: We learned how users see advertisements.

We learned what they thought about the game. We spent a month in beta in Japan testing it. SIMON HADE: So we had to find people who would like our game locally, who could be ambassadors for us. So then when were live, they were really the voice of our players in Japan. JOE REABURN: The alphabeta testing feature in the Google Play Development Console is a good way to go.

So you can hand-select a group of people that are associated with the Google group. And then, you can start getting feedback from users. You start seeing how your game performs in the real world.

For our marketing material on the Google Play Store, we wanted it to look like a local Japanese company had created it, which really meant more exclamation marks and cooler character drawings. We used our internal Japanese staff to tell us how to look. And we got it together. Turns out, it looks really cool, looks really exciting.

TOBY MOORE: Google Play has been a great platform to develop with. Ive really enjoyed the fast iteration speed and the way that Google think about bringing games to the Google Play Store and working with the partnership team there. JOHN EARNER: Experience has been great with Google Play.

We have found that it is about half of our audience and half of our business. Thrilling as it has been to have the success weve had to date, the thing that were really looking for, that next step, is down the road. I think thats what keeps people going in gaming is its always the thrill of working on the next game and seeing it go live.

And so, Im looking forward to the next one.

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